PHASEIN EMMA Emergency Capnometer  | Used in Patient monitoring | Which Medical Device

EMMA Emergency Capnometer

Added Jan 23, 2012

Manufactured by PHASEIN

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Reviewed by Dr Ian Nesbitt Reviewed Jun 17, 2011

Consultant Anaesthetist, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK - No Conflict Declared

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I first came across this in pre-hospital medicine, where it had been adopted by the British military Medical Emergency Response Team. Other obvious uses in civilian, hospital practice could include intra-hospital transfers of intubated patients, confirming return of spontaneous circulation following cardiac arrest, or routine monitoring of CO2 in Critical Care to reduce frequency of blood gas sampling.

I first came across this in pre-hospital medicine, where it had been adopted by the British military Medical Emergency Response Team. Other obvious uses in civilian, hospital practice could include intra-hospital transfers of intubated patients, confirming return of spontaneous circulation following cardiac arrest, or routine monitoring of CO2 in Critical Care to reduce frequency of blood gas sampling.

EMMA is an inline capnometer with a real time digital display (in mmHg or kPa) of CO2 and respiratory rate.

Simply connect an airway adapter into the circuit and attach the EMMA to this (see photos)
Compared with traditional methods of verifying correct placement of endotracheal tubes, the EMMA is a significant advance for pre-hospital and austere conditions especially: no wires, no bulky monitor, minimal warmup time, water resistant, and easy to store in a variety of climatic conditions. The menu (sound on/off is a little bit fiddly, but that’s a minor point against all the advantages of this device.
At only 60g weight (much of which is the two AAA batteries), the only significant drawback is that it’s relatively easy to lose (despite a carrying case with lanyard), and will be very attractive to those with sticky fingers.

Whether you’re a pre-hospital doctor looking for a capnograph to scale your unit supplies or an individual who wants a personal device, this handy little device fits the bill nicely (especially if you can get someone else to pay for it).

Highly recommended.

In Nesbitt, Consultant Anaesthetist, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK - No Conflict Declared 

Ian Nesbitt qualified from Newcastle upon Tyne Medical School, trained in the UK, Australia and New Zealand. He works as a consultant in the NHS in Anaesthesia & Critical Care.

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